Best Lutein Supplements: Top 10 Lutein Brands Reviewed

Best Lutein Supplements

Lutein, like the other useful eye antioxidant zeaxanthin, is a substance with a carotenoid structure, resembling beta-carotene (pre-vitamin A). Lutein is a xanthophyll and is synthesized in many green plants such as spinach and kale.

Lutein exhibits powerful antioxidant properties and is metabolized primarily in the eyes. The retina of the eye synthesizes lutein, whose main purpose is to protect it against the blue light and the free radicals.

The intake of lutein supplementation indicates positive results, whether this is lutein in its free form or lutein ester.

The intake of 10.23 mg of lutein ester and 5.5 mg of free lutein leads to an immediate increase in the lutein serum with 20-29% and a solid increase of 82% of its after 10 days of dosing.

Top 5 Best Selling Lutein Supplements


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California Gold Nutrition Lutein with Zeaxanthin 10 mg 120 TapiOgels, Egg-Free, Gluten-Free, Fish-Free, Milk-Free, Peanut Free, Soy-Free, Shellfish Free, Treenut Free, Wheat-Free, CGN


#1

California Gold Nutrition Lutein with Zeaxanthin
Doctor's Best Lutein with OptiLut, Non-GMO, Vegan, Gluten Free, Soy Free, Eye Health, 10 mg, 120 Veggie Caps

#2

Doctor's Best Lutein with OptiLut
NOW Foods Lutein 10 mg Softgels, 120

#3

Now Foods Lutein
Solgar – Lutein 20 mg, 60 Softgels

#4

Solgar Lutein
Natural Factors, Lutein 40 mg, 60 Softgels, Antioxidant Support for Healthy Eyes and Skin with Zeaxanthin, 60 Servings

#5

Natural Factors Lutein

What Is Lutein

Lutein, like the other useful eye antioxidant zeaxanthin, is a substance with a carotenoid structure, resembling beta-carotene (pre-vitamin A). Lutein is a xanthophyll and is synthesized in many green plants such as spinach and kale.

Lutein exhibits powerful antioxidant properties and is metabolized primarily in the eyes. Lutein is the reason for the yellow color in animal products.

The retina of the eye synthesizes lutein, whose main purpose is to protect it against the blue light and the free radicals. In its natural form lutein is a fatty acid ester. It is also an isomer of zeaxanthin, the only difference between the two substances is a bond.

Lutein, like the other carotenoids, gets absorbed relatively easily in the body, but under specified conditions. It has been found that lutein is a fat-soluble substance and is absorbed better with the intake of a fat matrix.

On the other hand, the raw plant sources decrease their absorption. This is one of the reasons to recommend egg yolk to be the recommended major food source and not spinach.

How Does Lutein Work

Lutein’s bioactivity in the body is relatively high, whether taken as food or a dietary supplement. Eating an egg a day increases the lutein in the plasma by nearly 26%.

The daily consumption of more eggs increases the percentage of lutein in the plasma and the long-term consumption of enriched eggs for 8 weeks increases steadily its levels by 88%. The intake of lutein supplementation also indicates positive results, whether this is lutein in its free form or lutein ester.

The intake of 10.23 mg of lutein ester and 5.5 mg of free lutein leads to an immediate increase in the lutein serum with 20-29% and a solid increase of 82% of its after 10 days of dosing.

The advantage of the lutein ester is that it increases the plasma concentrations of lutein, without leaving esters in the blood. The increased lutein levels in the serum are not directly tied to the increased levels of lutein in the eyes.

Most comparative studies have found that the increasing of lutein in the eyes is not proportional, and almost twice as low. Once in the body, the metabolism of lutein depends on lipoproteins, rich in triglycerides.

Lutein uses the triglycerides in the body as transportation means, as indeed most carotenoids function. Lutein is relatively stable in the human body and it is believed that it lasts a long time, without being discarded from the body. 

In this regard, scientists have not reached a consensus. There are studies that have found that the increased lutein does not get discarded from the body even after 13 weeks, and there are some that establish normalized levels after 4 weeks.

Which Foods Are Richest in Lutein

Lutein is a completely natural substance and is present in many foods. Foods that are richest in lutein are egg yolk, spinach, and corn. The concentration of lutein in 1 yolk ranges between 150 and 600 mg, as the quantity is different in the different eggs. 

The richest source of lutein, however, is spinach, where the concentrations can reach18 mg per 100 grams. Many fruits and vegetables also contain lutein. It is considered that a rich diet can provide more than 3 mg of lutein daily. 

Lutein, like the other carotenoids, is released after heat treatment, so the concentrations in spinach and corn are higher after cooking.

Lutein and Eye Health:

Lutein helps directly in some eye conditions:

  • Lutein helps the function of the macula in permanent macular degeneration due to age (ARMD). ARMD covers adults over 65 years and there are two types of ARMD - dry and wet. The dry form is successfully treated with lutein, which increases the pigmentation. Comparative tests have shown that the combination of lutein and zeaxanthin is far more effective than the use of beta-carotene.
  • The levels of macular pigmentation increase in elderly people, who are not suffering from ARMD.
  • Epidemiological studies have concluded that sufficient amounts of lutein in the eyes can delay or prevent the onset of cataracts.
  • A study has found that a daily intake of 10 mg of lutein can improve visual performance and can reduce the sensitivity of the eyes to light.

Recommended Doses

The standard safe daily dosage of lutein is between 6 and 12 mg, although, no side effects have been noted with high doses.

The long-term intake of 15 mg of lutein within 2 years does not indicate any problems for the body, as well as any side effects. The tolerance dose in certain problem conditions can be increased to 20 mg per day.

Side Effects

It is believed that lutein is a safe substance as long as it does not exceed 20 mg per day for an extended period of time because carotenoids get discarded from the body difficulty.

Lutein is safe for pregnant and breastfeeding women if taken in the recommended doses up to 12 mg daily. Lutein is not contraindicated with certain medical conditions. 

It is possible that individuals with cystic fibrosis will not absorb lutein and other carotenoids fully. The only apparent side effect of the excessive consumption of lutein is the emergence of the so-called bronze skin (carotenoderma).

What to Combine Lutein With

Lutein is supplemented with zeaxanthin for the maintenance of eye health. Besides the similar structure, both the carotenoids perform similar functions, as they are synthesized in different parts of the retina.

Their concomitant use would have a synergistic effect:

  • Lutein can be combined with other powerful antioxidants such as blueberry, beta-carotene, astaxanthin and krill oil.
  • There are no supplements or medications that lutein interacts with negatively.
  • The raw plant foods reduce the absorption of lutein, while fats enhance it.

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