Best L-Tyrosine Supplements: Top 10 L-Tyrosine Brands Reviewed

L-tyrosine is a nonessential amino acid that is part of the composition of proteins in our bodies.

This means that normally the body can only synthesize enough tyrosine by converting another amino acid - L-phenylalanine. Tyrosine is always present - in our food, in our supplements, even in some drinks. 

Allegedly l-tyrosine reduces the stress level in our body - including the one, caused by workouts - reduces depression, anxiety and mental fatigue at monotonous work. Here you will find out how the body uses it.

Top 5 Best Selling L-Tyrosine Supplements


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NOW Supplements, L-Tyrosine 500 mg, Supports Mental Alertness*, Neurotransmitter Support*, 120 Capsules


#1

Now Foods L-Tyrosine
Thorne Research - L-Tyrosine - Amino Acid Supplement to Support Production of Dopamine and Norepinephrine - 90 Capsules

#2

Thorne Research L-Tyrosine
Source Naturals L-Tyrosine 500mg Free Form Amino Acid - 100 Tablets (Pack of 3)

#3

Source Naturals L-Tyrosine
Solgar – L-Tyrosine 500 mg, 100 Vegetable Capsules

#4

Solgar L-Tyrosine
Country Life L-Tyrosine 500mg with Vitamin B-6, 100 Capsules, Amino Acid Supports Brain Health, Gluten-Free, Vegetarian

#5

Country Life L-Tyrosine

What Is L-Tyrosine

L-tyrosine is a nonessential amino acid that is part of the composition of proteins in our bodies. This means that normally the body can only synthesize enough tyrosine by converting another amino acid - L-phenylalanine.

Tyrosine is always present - in our food, in our supplements, even in some drinks. Here you will find out how the body uses it.

Under certain circumstances, however, as in the disease phenylketonuria, this is not possible and tyrosine is converted to an essential (irreplaceable) amino acid that must be intaken through food or by supplements.

Because of these reasons, the charts of recommended daily intake of nutrients contain the composition "phenylalanine + tyrosine," and there is no daily dose of these two amino acids individually.

Major Physiological Effects

Tyrosine is a component of most proteins in our bodies. It is a starting material from which our body produces the so-called catecholamines or neurotransmitters (hormones involved in the conducting of nerve impulses in the nervous system).

These include dopamine, dihydroxyphenylalanine, norepinephrine and epinephrine (in the central and peripheral nervous systems and adrenal glands) and triiodothyronine and thyroxine by the thyroid gland. 

The pigment melanin (which gives the brown color to the skin and hair) is also formed from tyrosine.

Optimal Dose and Way of Intake

An adult should take 33 mg/kg weight/day through their food, which usually means from 2.8 to 6.4 grams per day. 

An additional intake through supplements can be usually taken from 0.5 to 1.5 grams per day.

Side Effects

Since tyrosine is present in large amounts in many foods, so far no serious side effects from its use (even in large quantities) of healthy people have been found. 

Only in a small part of people, taking extra tyrosine, have experienced nervousness and insomnia.

The use of supplements containing tyrosine is contraindicated for people with melanoma, congenital metabolic disorders (alkaptonuria and tyrosinemia type I and type II), as well as of allergies thereto.

Tyrorise should be avoided when using antidepressants (eg. phenelzine sulfate), which act by inhibiting the monoamine oxidase enzyme. 

This enzyme breaks down catecholamines in our body and if we block its action by antidepressants, this can lead to a dangerous increase of blood pressure.

Benefits of Taking Tyrosine

Allegedly tyrosine reduces the stress level in our body - including the one, caused by workouts - reduces depression, anxiety and mental fatigue at monotonous work, but also:

  • improves vigilance;
  • helps increase the intensity of your workout;
  • speeds up recovery after exercise;
  • prevents overtraining - mainly by influencing the level of neurotransmitters;
  • increases the outflow of heat from the body and the degradation of fat;
  • helps reduce the use of coffee.

Still, no unquestionably positive evidence for these claims has been found, as the main research on the effects of tyrosine supplementation on health has been conducted on mice and very few - on people. 

Most evidence of its effect on humans is, however, the first three allegations.

How Is It Absorbed By the Body

After swallowing L-tyrosine is absorbed by the body in the small intestine by sodium-dependent active transport. It is then transported to the liver by the blood flow.

L-tyrosine is included in a number of processes including protein synthesis and oxidative metabolic reactions. 

The part of it, which is not absorbed by the liver, is transported in a number of tissues in the body by the circulatory system.

Which Foods Contain L-Tyrosine In the Greatest Amount

Tyrosine can be found in all proteins of plant or animal origin, largest amounts can be found in yogurt, turkey meat, seafood, tofu, tuna fish and legumes such as beans and soybeans.

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